Thursday, April 24, 2014

Heather Hutchinson-Schuster with Hannah Stoner

Heather Hutchinson-Schuster is a native of Dubuque, IA and the Catering Sales Manager at Hotel Julien Dubuque. She credits her joy of cooking to her mother and grandmother who taught her how from a young tender age. Many of the recipes Heather shares are old family favorites that have been passed down and perfected through the years. Heather invites you to gather around your table and try out the recipes, tips, and tricks in her “Chef’s Corner” column each month. Please email her at schusterchef@gmail.com with your recipes, helpful tips and tricks in the kitchen, and ideas for upcoming columns. Hannah Stoner is an 11-year-old Roosevelt Middle School student who loves cooking. She is excited to share with you some of her favorite recipes in the “For Kids, By Kids” At Your Table column. The recipes she shares are easy for kids to do with their parents or guardians and are kid approved.

Food Fiesta

Food Fiesta

Cinco de Mayo is a Mexican holiday full of rich history and Mexican pride. While Cinco de Mayo is merely a date in the Spanish language, it represents a significant event in the history of Mexico. The roots of this observance are actually very complex. This day commemorates the Mexican Army’s astonishing triumph over the French that took place on May 5, 1862.

Taste, At Your Table | By Heather Hutchinson-Schuster with Hannah Stoner

What You See Is Not Necessarily What You Get

What You See Is Not Necessarily What You Get

Tricks and treats are not only reserved for Halloween, play some tricks on the first day of April, also known as April Fool’s Day. Tricks and pranks on this day range from telling fun white lies that get a person going all the way to complex, well-planned hoaxes that fool the masses. One of the greatest media hoaxes of all times was on April 1, 1947 by the BBC. The media reported on one of its news programs that Switzerland was experiencing a bumper spaghetti harvest that year thanks to favorable weather and the elimination of the spaghetti weevil. They perpetuated the hoax by showing staged video footage showing happy peasants plucking strands of pasta from tall trees. The footage and story were so convincing that many viewers actually called the network to ask how they could grow their own. The BBC was resolved to announcing the next day that everyone who watched had been “April Fooled.”

Taste, At Your Table | By Heather Hutchinson-Schuster with Hannah Stoner

Magical Rainbows in the Kitchen

Magical Rainbows in the Kitchen

A rainbow appears in the sky, and the story of a “pot of gold” at the end of it jumps into our mind. The rare and lovely appearance of rainbows makes them incredibly magical for children and adults alike. Where does this legend come from? It dates back to Old Europe, where the Irish will tell you, “fairies put a pot of gold at the end of each rainbow with leprechauns guarding it.” This type of folklore has become part of the symbolism of St. Patrick’s Day, March 17, when many celebrate Irish culture and count themselves as “Irish” just for wearing a little green.

Taste, At Your Table | By Heather Hutchinson-Schuster with Hannah Stoner

Valentine’s Day Breakfast in Bed

Valentine’s Day Breakfast in Bed

February 14 in the United States and other parts of the world marks the day of love. Candy, flowers, and gifts are given between loved ones in the name of St. Valentine. St. Valentine’s historical beginning is one of uncertainty. Three main stories surround who the legend may have been. All three stories, however, have a common tie between them – that St. Valentine was a sympathetic and heroic person who was a romantic. During the middle ages, it was believed that February 14 marked the beginning of mating season for birds. This perpetuated the idea that this day should be marked as a day of romance.

Taste, At Your Table | By Heather Hutchinson-Schuster with Hannah Stoner

Celebrate the Chinese New Year

Celebrate the Chinese New Year

Gung Hay Fat Choy! Happy New Year! The Chinese New Year (also known as the Spring Festival) starts with the New Moon on the first day of the New Year and ends on the full moon 15 days later. If you were born in 1918, 1930, 1942, 1954, 1966, 1978, 1990, 2002, or 2014 you were born under the sign of the horse. Like the horse, you have a love of wide-open spaces and have an independent streak that others can only envy.

Taste, At Your Table | By Heather Hutchinson-Schuster with Hannah Stoner

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